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  • Compassion Fatigue: A Self-Care Imperative

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 08/11/2020 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This presentation will focus on the meaning of compassion and distinctions between burnout and compassion fatigue.

    This webinar will outline some concrete steps that are available to all to help restore and heal the mind, body and spirit that are impacted by compassion fatigue, at any time, but particularly in this time of COVID-19.

    This webinar is designed for individual members of Congregations as well as leadership and healthcare providers.

    Mary T. O'Neill, BCC, D. Min.

    Retired VP of Spiritual Care and Pastoral Education, Catholic Health Services

    Mary T. O’Neill has over 30 years of experience with training Ministry students for national board certification as Chaplains and spiritual care providers to patients, families and staff persons in healthcare. She is certified as a Pastoral Educator through the National Association of Catholic Chaplains and the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. Mary T. is also a Licensed Therapeutic Massage Therapist and has worked many years in care for persons struggling with illness, disability and the diminishment of age. For 18 years, Mary was employed as the Assistant Administrator/Director of Pastoral Services at Calvary Hospital in Bronx, NY, a specialty palliative care hospital that emphasizes care for the whole person, body, mind and spirit. Her recent employment for 13 years was with Catholic Health Services of Long Island (CHSLI), NY, as VP for Spiritual Care and Pastoral Education. Catholic Health Services is a health system that covers a wide spectrum of health and behavioral services. She received her master's degree from St. Louis University and her Doctor of Ministry from New York Theological Seminary. She is currently actively retired and living in Maryland.

  • Disorders and Diagnoses that Differ from Dementia

    Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this 1-hour presentation, Alfred W. Norwood will discuss the differences between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia while exploring how depression and delirium also differentiate from dementia. It is broken down into two parts, "Is It Alzheimer's?" and "The 3D's: Depression, Delirium, and Dementia."

    Webinar Description

    This webinar discusses the differences between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia while exploring how depression and delirium also differentiate from dementia. It is broken down into two parts:

    Is It Alzheimer's? 

    There are multiple diseases that can cause dementia, which is an umbrella of symptoms that affect memory, thinking and can make daily life very complicated. Since more than one disease can cause dementia, it can be difficult to decipher what is actually causing the dementia. Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA, will describe:

    • How Alzheimer's disease (the most common disorder that causes dementia) affects the brain
    • Causes and effects of Alzheimer's disease
    • How caregivers define resident quality of life 

    The 3D's: Depression, Delirium, and Dementia

    Depression, delirium and dementia can be difficult to differentiate. It is important that caregivers understand typical resident behaviors so that they accurately observe any changes. Understanding the resident ensures he or she is appropriately treated for depression, delirium or dementia. This provides valuable insight to the healthcare team on the differences between these three diagnoses. You will learn:

    • About dementia and other common diseases of aging
    • Depression and its causes and symptoms
    • How depression differs from dementia and how to help
    • Delirium and its causes and symptoms
    • How delirium differs from dementia
    • Improper medication use as a source of delirium



    More Information

    If you have any questions or concerns about this program, please contact us at info@avilainstitute.org. 

    Registrants seeking continuing education will be asked to watch the live webinar in full, pass a post-test, and submit an evaluation form. 

    • Administrators (NAB): This program has been approved for Continuing Education for 1.25 total participant hours by NAB/NCERS— Approval #20210421-1.25-A66823-DL.
    • Catholic Chaplains: The National Association of Catholic Chaplains has approved this program for a total of 1.0 Continuing Education Hours.
    • New York State Social Workers:  Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0265. Participants can earn 1.0 contact hours.
  • The Spiritual Journey of Caregiving: Finding Compassion for Ourselves and Others

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/11/2020

    This 1-hour webinar, presented by Denise Hess, MDiv, BCC-PCHAC, will look at the caregiving landscape in the US and then take a close look at one of the best spiritual guides for the transformative power of caregiving, author and Catholic priest Henri Nouwen.

    With over 43 million caregivers in the US, it is very likely that many of us will experience the joys and challenges of providing care for a loved one at some point in our lives. Caregivers consistently report that caregiving can be one of the most stressful, yet also the most meaningful roles they have ever undertaken. Approaching caregiving as a spiritual endeavor can increase the likelihood that the role will be fulfilling, nourishing, and possibly transformative. This webinar will look at the caregiving landscape in the US and then take a close look at one of the best spiritual guides for the transformative power of caregiving, author and Catholic priest Henri Nouwen. After exploring Nouwen’s unique vision for caregiving, we will focus on the necessity of self-compassion to avoid caregiver burnout. Webinar participants will learn a self-compassion practice for use in their own caregiving roles. 

    This webinar is designed for individual members of Congregations as well as leadership and healthcare providers.

    Denise Hess, MDiv, BCC-PCHAC

    Executive Director, Supportive Care Coalition

    Denise currently serves as the Executive Director of the Supportive Care Coalition - a partnership of Catholic health care ministries from across the U.S. committed to advancing excellence in palliative care. Denise comes to the Coalition with over a decade of experience in palliative care clinical practice and organizational leadership. She is also a licensed psychotherapist, an ordained Presbyterian minister, and a palliative care chaplain. She is happily married with two amazing adult children.

  • Dementia Progression from Moderate to Advanced

    Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar discusses the effects of dementia in moderate to advanced stages. It’s broken down into two parts: Understanding Moderate Dementia and Advanced Dementia.

    This webinar discusses the effects of dementia in moderate to advanced stages. It’s broken down into two parts:    

    Understanding Moderate Dementia

    It’s challenging to understand how life changes brought on by moderate dementia will affect a person. Some days will feel normal with the person having full ability to remember and carry on normal activities. Some days will be full of confusion and disorientation which affects communication and understanding. This can be extremely frustrating to persons with dementia as well as to their caregivers. Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA, addresses the knowledge necessary for providing excellent care through the middle stage of dementia.

    Participants will learn:

    • What it feels like to have moderate dementia: confusion, stress, and disorientation
    • The five burdens of family caregivers
    • Details of changes in thinking, emotions, personality, and physical ability
    • Best communication strategies to use for moderate dementia
    • Techniques to assist residents with ADLs
    • How to master the three steps of any ADL: Approach, Gain cooperation, and Reward
    •  

    Advanced Dementia 

    Care staff work endlessly to provide quality care for residents with advanced dementia. It’s a very difficult but rewarding job. Residents with advanced dementia are unable to verbalize their wants and needs and are completely dependent during ADLs. Understanding the look and feel of advanced dementia is key when caring for these residents. Caregivers must be fluent in communicating with residents with dementia and recognize that behaviors are attempts at communication. It’s crucial that caregivers of residents with advanced dementia be educated in the fragile experience of the dying process for the resident, as well as the grieving process for the family.

    This webinar will review many important topics, such as:

    • The look and feel of advanced dementia
    • End-stage dementia and dying
    • Advanced dementia and memory
    • Advanced dementia and cognition
    • Behaviors
    • Positive environment modifications
    • Advanced dementia and pain
    • Advanced dementia and spirituality
    • General communication in severe dementia
    • How not to communicate with a resident with advanced dementia
    • ADLs (activities of daily living) communication in advanced dementia
    • Grief and grieving

     

    Registrants seeking continuing education will be asked to watch the live webinar in full, pass a post-test, and submit an evaluation form. 

    • Administrators (NAB): This program has been approved for Continuing Education for 1.25 total participant hours by NAB/NCERS— APPROVAL # 20210421-1.25-A66848-DL
    • Catholic Chaplains: The National Association of Catholic Chaplains has approved this program for a total of 1.00 Continuing Education Hours.
    • New York State Social Workers:  Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0265. Participants can earn up to 1.0 contact hours.

    Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA

    Faculty, Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc.

    Mr. Norwood holds a BS degree and graduate study in Physiological Psychology from Michigan State University and an MBA from the University of Chicago. For 25 years he was the founder and managing partner of Organization Development Associates Inc. (Minneapolis, Palo Alto & Brussels), a management consulting company assisting multinational organizations in team based strategic planning and corporate development. Upon moving to Rochester, he founded Companion Radio a satellite service to LTC and Assisted Living facilities. Observing the impending aging care crisis, he formed Behavior Science, Inc. which developed tools and training programs for nursing homes, assisted living and home care agencies. For 15 years he has worked with Sr. Peter at the Avila Institute of Gerontology to help Avila clients better meet the needs of seniors they serve.

  • Dementia Stages and their Effects on Independence

    Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this 1-hour presentation, Alfred W. Norwood will discuss the stages of dementia while describing actions to take once it becomes more advanced. It is broken down into two parts, "Stages of Dementia" and "Strategies to Promote Independence for People with Dementia."

    Webinar Description

    This webinar discusses the stages of dementia while describing actions to take once it becomes more advanced. It's broken down into two parts:

    Stages of Dementia

    Dementia is a collection of symptoms that progressively worsen. It’s essential that care staff understand how to interact with residents with dementia. The better the care, the better the quality (and often length) of life. Caregivers searching to improve their methods for residents with dementia will find information in this webinar valuable, as Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA, presents:

    • Why dementia is a diagnosis and not a disease
    • Understanding dementia’s progressive stages
    • How to get to know the residents to improve quality of life
    • Adjusting activities depending on the stage of dementia
    • Age-associated memory impairment
    • Risk factors for memory impairment
    • Early signs of possible dementia

     
    Strategies to Promote Independence for People with Dementia

    Since dementia is a combination of symptoms that worsen over time, residents’ coordination and mobility progressively deteriorate, leading to difficulty walking and even swallowing. The cumulative loss of independence leads to eventual dependence on caregivers, with resident behavior ever less predictable and more difficult to manage. In this webinar we will discuss strategies to help promote residents’ independence even as dementia worsens.  

    Participants will learn:

    • How dementia, stress and dependence are linked  
    • How to use procedural memory to help residents improve memory ability, language, and everyday function  
    • How to use errorless learning and rituals
    • How to build rituals and use errorless learning to promote independence   
    • How to provide control and social support to residents to alleviate behaviors



    More Information

    If you have any questions or concerns about this program, please contact us at info@avilainstitute.org. 

    Registrants seeking continuing education will be asked to watch the live webinar in full, pass a post-test, and submit an evaluation form. 

    • Administrators (NAB): This program has been approved for Continuing Education for 1.00 total participant hours by NAB/NCERS— APPROVAL # 20210421-1.00-A66847-DL.
    • Catholic Chaplains: The National Association of Catholic Chaplains has approved this program for a total of .75 Continuing Education Hours.
    • New York State Social Workers:  Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0265. Participants can earn .75 contact hours.

    Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA

    Faculty, Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc.

    Mr. Norwood holds a BS degree and graduate study in Physiological Psychology from Michigan State University and an MBA from the University of Chicago. For 25 years he was the founder and managing partner of Organization Development Associates Inc. (Minneapolis, Palo Alto & Brussels), a management consulting company assisting multinational organizations in team based strategic planning and corporate development. Upon moving to Rochester, he founded Companion Radio a satellite service to LTC and Assisted Living facilities. Observing the impending aging care crisis, he formed Behavior Science, Inc. which developed tools and training programs for nursing homes, assisted living and home care agencies. For 15 years he has worked with Sr. Peter at the Avila Institute of Gerontology to help Avila clients better meet the needs of seniors they serve.

  • Understanding the Dementia Resident

    Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this 1-hr presentation, we will discuss the ways caregivers can identify stress in a dementia resident and how to effectively communicate with that person. It’s broken down into two parts, "Is the Person with Dementia Stressed?" and "Communicating in Dementia."

    This webinar discusses the ways caregivers can identify stress in a dementia resident and how to effectively communicate with that person. It’s broken down into two parts:

    Is the Person with Dementia Stressed?

    There is no doubt that loss of ability, memory, and increased disorientation lead to stress, behaviors, and dependence. In this webinar, Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA, will discuss how and why stress originates for residents with dementia and how to reduce stress in their dementia experience.

    Participants will learn:

    • Key dementia facts and stages
    • How changes in dementia affect the ability to predict events, thereby causing stress
    • The body’s reaction to stress: fight, flight, or freeze
    • How constant stress impacts long-term health
    • The 3 causes of stress and how caregivers can minimize each cause
    • What psychotropic drugs are useful for and when they are inappropriately prescribed
    • Psychosocial interventions for caregivers that are more effective than drugs to reduce stress

    Communicating in Dementia

    Memory loss accumulates for the person with dementia, and they may have difficulty responding to questions, remembering details, or keeping pace with a conversation. This poses unique communication challenges that require empathy, patience, and knowledge. This session will discuss an array of practical skills for communicating with those with dementia.

    Participants will learn:

    • A breakdown of each step necessary in naming and communicating an idea in a healthy brain and how dementia impairs those steps
    • Symptoms of memory loss on communication
    • The impact of dementia, memory loss, and stress on communication
    • The 3 major causes of stress and how it impacts behavior for someone with dementia
    • 4 Rules for improving communication
    • How to build your listening skills
    • Person-centered, practical tools for effective communication with the person with dementia
    • How to negotiate challenging behavioral situations
    • How to cultivate the right environment for making communication successful

    Registrants seeking continuing education will be asked to watch the live webinar in full, pass a post-test, and submit an evaluation form. 

    • Administrators (NAB): This program has been approved for Continuing Education for 1.0 total participant hours by NAB/NCERS— APPROVAL # 20210421-1.00-A66849-DL
    • Catholic Chaplains: The National Association of Catholic Chaplains has approved this program for a total of .75 Continuing Education Hours.
    • New York State Social Workers:  Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0265. Participants can earn up to .75 contact hours.

    Alfred W. Norwood, BS, MBA

    Faculty, Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc.

    Mr. Norwood holds a BS degree and graduate study in Physiological Psychology from Michigan State University and an MBA from the University of Chicago. For 25 years he was the founder and managing partner of Organization Development Associates Inc. (Minneapolis, Palo Alto & Brussels), a management consulting company assisting multinational organizations in team based strategic planning and corporate development. Upon moving to Rochester, he founded Companion Radio a satellite service to LTC and Assisted Living facilities. Observing the impending aging care crisis, he formed Behavior Science, Inc. which developed tools and training programs for nursing homes, assisted living and home care agencies. For 15 years he has worked with Sr. Peter at the Avila Institute of Gerontology to help Avila clients better meet the needs of seniors they serve.

  • The Relationship Between Staffing and Census: How to Tie Staff Levels to Your Census

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    This 1-hour presentation will look at how to evaluate your staffing budget.

    Most Communities spend an enormous amount of time trying to determine the right staffing levels for each department for each new budget year. And what is it that ties these staffing budgets to the real employees who are working in the departments? Is there a relationship between staffing and census? Join us and learn how to evaluate your staffing budget. We’ll also address staffing concerns in times of crisis, which is especially relevant in the current COVID-19 situation. Staffing is not just about creating department budgets once a year; it is an ongoing process that is shared between department directors and leadership each month. 

    This webinar is designed for individual members of Congregations as well as leadership and healthcare providers.

    Denise Gannon

    CEO of CSJ Initiatives

    Denise Gannon has served as the CEO of CSJ Initiatives since October 2018.  She is responsible for working with the staff in developing and overseeing the various management agreements with the Congregation’s six centers as well as those with other religious Congregations.  She also explores possible management options with other Congregations who express an interest in the services of CSJ Initiatives. Denise has served in the Health Care industry since 1996 in various roles from Director of Nursing, Director of Clinical and Support Services, VP of Wellness and Performance Improvement, VP of Wellness and Community Based Services to VP of Post-Acute Services.  She has also brought an innovative dementia program to the US and has established partnerships and collaborations with community and professional resources.

    Bill Slater

    Director of Finance at CSJ Initiatives

    Bill Slater brings over three decades of experience in the long-term care industry to his current position as Director of Finance at CSJ Initiatives. As Director of Finance, Bill is directly responsible for legal business formations, monthly financial reporting, third party billing, annual budget, audit, and cost report preparation. During his career he has been responsible for computer operations and network management within the finance/information systems departments, serving a network of multi-site locations in a multi-state region with more than 250 individual users. In the course of his career, he has coordinated the installation and training of approximately 30 network systems across the United States, developed an innovative inventory tracking system, and served as the lead team member in successfully implementing the prospective payment system.

  • Beads, Bells and Blessings: Understanding why the Mass and Other Catholic Practices are Essential

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/21/2019

    This 1-hour webinar, presented by Sr. Ginger Downey, OLVM, will look at the many different Catholic practices that are important to men and women religious and how staff can assist in their living their religious life, no matter their mental or physical circumstance.

    This 1-hour webinar, presented by Sr. Ginger Downey, OLVM, will look at the many different Catholic practices that are important to men and women religious and how staff can assist in their living their religious life, no matter their mental or physical circumstance.

    This webinar is designed for individual members of Congregations as well as leadership and healthcare providers.

    Sr. Ginger Downey, OLVM

    Leadership Team for the Congregation of Our Lady of Victory Missionary Sisters

    Sr. Ginger Downey, OLVM, is a current member of the Leadership Team for the Congregation of Our Lady of Victory Missionary Sisters, commonly known at Victory Noll sisters.  She has been a member of the congregations since 1986.

    Sr. Ginger is a native of Wyoming and has a Bachelor's degree in Sociology from the University of Wyoming and a Master's degree in Theology, emphasis in Liturgical Studies, from St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota.  She has served in parishes as Director of Religious Education and Pastoral Associate in Catechetics and Liturgy. She served as Liturgist for Newman Center at Arizona State University and as the Diocesan Director of Worship for the Diocese of Phoenix. Her latest ministry before her election to leadership in 2012, was with Faith on Fire, an adult formation ministry which she co-founded to provide faith formation for adults in theology and liturgy.  Sr. Ginger continues to do workshop and training in liturgy, while serving in Congregational Leadership.  She has been a presenter at the Southwest Liturgical Conference, coordinator of liturgy for the Conference of Major Superiors of Men, prayer leader for the Institute Canon and Civil Law for Religious and continues to be a retreat and spiritual companion for men and women throughout the United States.  

  • Well-Being and Dementia

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/21/2019

    During this presentation Mr. Owen will discuss the pattern of the progression of Dementia and the five basic psychological and spiritual needs of people with dementia. Additionally, he will discuss the essential components of person-centered care, along with the utilization of visual and experiential arts in facilitating a sense of well-being in the person with dementia.

    During this presentation Mr. Owen will discuss the pattern of the progression of Dementia and the five basic psychological and spiritual needs of people with dementia. Additionally, he will discuss the essential components of person-centered care, along with the utilization of visual and experiential arts in facilitating a sense of well-being in the person with dementia.

    Edward Owen Jr., BS, PGDip, MA, LNHA

    Faculty, Avila Institute of Gerontology, Inc.

    Ed is a Licensed Nursing Home Administrator in two states, with more than 40 years of both clinical and administrative experience in healthcare. He holds a BS in Health Care Administration from Excelsior College, a PGDip in Dementia Studies from the University of Bradford, and an MA of Theology from Saint Leo University. Additionally, Ed is an ordained permanent deacon in the Catholic Church and is assigned to Saint Benedict Catholic Church in Richmond, Virginia.

  • What Does Canon and Civil Law Have to Say About Health Issues?

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    his presentation with Sister Sharon Euart, RSM, Executive Director of the Resource Center for Religious Institutes, and Associate Director Christopher J. Fusco, Esq., will briefly explore some canon and civil law issues that might accompany religious during these years: guardianship and its alternatives, such as durable powers of attorney; health care decision making; the role of the institute and leadership; member issues - psychological and behavioral; financial considerations; and, considerations surrounding operation of a motor vehicle.

    All Americans, including members of religious institutes, are living longer due to medical advances, better nutritional habits, and improved living conditions generally. People who reached age 65 in 2011 had an average remaining life expectancy of 17.8 years for males and 20.4 years for females. As a consequence, there are more people attaining ages that have historically been characterized as “old.” According to NRRO, in the year 2018, the median age of sixty-eight percent of religious in the US was 70 or greater. 

    This presentation with Sister Sharon Euart, RSM, Executive Director of the Resource Center for Religious Institutes, and Associate Director Christopher J. Fusco, Esq., will briefly explore some canon and civil law issues that might accompany religious during these years: guardianship and its alternatives, such as durable powers of attorney; health care decision making; the role of the institute and leadership; member issues - psychological and behavioral; financial considerations; and, considerations surrounding operation of a motor vehicle. Sister Sharon and Chris will be available for questions following the presentation.

    This webinar is designed for individual members of Congregations as well as leadership and healthcare providers.


    Sharon Euart, RSM, JCD

    Executive Director, Resource Center for Religious Institutes

    Sister Sharon is a Sister of Mercy of the Americas who holds a doctorate in canon law. Prior to coming to RCRI on April 1, 2014, she was the Executive Coordinator of the Canon Law Society of America.  She was Associate General Secretary of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops from 1988-2001. She taught canon law at the Catholic University of America and has served as  a canonical consultant for religious institutes and diocesan bishops. She Currently she serves as a consultant to the USCCB Committee on Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations. 

    Christopher J. Fusco, Esq.

    Associate Director for Civil Law, The Resource Center for Religious Institutes

    Christopher J. Fusco, Esq. is the Associate Director for Civil Law at The Resource Center for Religious Institutes in Silver Spring, Maryland. He is also the Associate General Counsel and Moderator of The Tribunal for the Diocese of Metuchen. He holds a master's degree in religious studies, as well as the licentiate degree in canon law, from The Catholic University of Louvain. He received his Juris Doctor degree from The City University of New York School of Law. Mr. Fusco is a member of the Bars of New York and New Jersey, and has been admitted to practice before all federal trial and appellate courts of those states, including the US District Court for the Southern District of New York and the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, as well as the US Court of International Trade, the US Tax Court, and the US Supreme Court. He and his wife, Patricia Scalese, live outside Princeton, New Jersey.